Warsaw City Centre Travel Guide

 

Monument to the Heroes of the Ghetto


more
The Monument to Heroes of the Ghetto is located by the square of the same name between Anielewicza, Zamenhofa, Karmelicka and Lewartowskiego streets. It was created by the sculptor Natan Rapaport and the architect Marek Suzin and unveiled in 1948, shortly after the end of Second World War when the whole city still...

Umschlagplatz Square and Monument


more
Umschlagplatz Square is the site where the former railway was siding on Dzika Street. From here around 300,000 Jews from Warsaw Ghetto and elsewhere were loaded onto cattle trucks and dispatched to almost certain death in the extermination camps, mainly to Auschwitz and Treblinka.

Pawiak Prison


more
Pawiak Prison was built in 1830s by Henryk Marconi on the command of the Russians. In the times of tsar, political opponents were imprisoned there. However, it gained the fame during the Nazi occupation, when it was used to imprison Poles and Jews arrested by the Germans.

Nozyk Synagogue


more
The Nozyk Synagogue was built in 1898 – 1902 and funded by Zelman and Ryfka Nozyk. It is located at Twarda Street at the back of the Jewish theatre. The entrance is modern and uninteresting but the building itself is authentic with neo-Romanesque and byzantine elements.

Palace of Culture and Science


more
Palace of Culture and Science is a landmark of Warsaw City visible from every corner of the capital. It is a huge building in the very centre of the city. It was a “gift” for the people of Warsaw from the nations of USSR. It was built in 1952 – 1955 to the design of a Russian architect, Lev Rudniev.

Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession


more
The Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession was designed by Szymon Bogumil Zug and built in 1777 – 1781. This Neo-Classical building is crowned by a dome 58 m high. For a long time the church was the highest building in Warsaw and bore witness to the religious tolerance of the Polish nation and of Stanislaw...

Saxon Gardens and Tomb of the Unknown Soldier


more
The Saxon Gardens were laid out between 1713 and 1733 by August II Mocny (the Strong) to a design by Jan Krzysztof Naumann and Mateus Daniel Poppelmann. In 1727 they became the first public park in Poland and served as a summer salon for Varsovians.

Plac Teatralny


more
Plac Teatralny is located close to the Old Town and Krakowskie Przedmiescie Street. It is the cultural heart of Warsaw. In the 19th century the square was dominated by huge National Theatre designed by Antonio Corazzi and Ludwik Kozubowski and completed in 1833.

Plac Bankowy


more
Plac Bankowy used to be a quiet little square but today is one of the most busiest places in Warsaw. Before the collapse of the Ghetto Uprising in 1943, the largest synagogue in Warsaw stood in this square. The most interesting buildings stand on the west side of the square.

Przebendowski Radziwillow Palace


more
Palace was built in 1728 to a design by Jan Zygmunt Deybel. This late-baroque three-storey palace is easily recognizable for its oval shape of the frontal part. It used to stand in narrow shopping street but after East – West route was constructed in 1949 it became surrounded by major traffic artery.

Pac Palace


more
Palace was built in 1728 to a design by Jan Zygmunt Deybel. This late-baroque three-storey palace is easily recognizable for its oval shape of the frontal part. It used to stand in narrow shopping street but after East – West route was constructed in 1949 it became surrounded by major traffic artery.

Branicki Palace


more
Palace was built in 1740 to a design by Jan Zygmunt Deybel and completed by Giacopo Fontana. It was built for Jan Klemens Branicki who was powerful magnate, adviser to August III and a connoisseur of fine art.

Primates's Palace


more
Palace was built for Primate Michal Radziejowski in 1691. Before it was old manor from 16th century which was converted into a palace. Since 1691 it was a home to Polish Primates, highest officials of the Catholic Church for around 200 years.

Warsaw City Centre


more
By “city centre” we mean the area between bordered by Jana Pawla II street from the west, Stawki street and Muranowska street from the north, Miodowa Street and Czackiego Street from the east and Aleje Jerozolimskie from the south.
 
 
 

This site uses cookies. Some of the cookies we use are essential for parts of the site to operate and have already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but parts of the site will not work. OK